Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Are mental health problems common ?

  2. What causes mental health problems ?

  3. How are mental health problems diagnosed? 

  4. Is a diagnosis necessary for treatment with Capital CBT? 

  5. What are the most common mental health problems?

  6. How can mental health problems be treated? 

  7. How can complimentary therapies help mental health?

  8. How do counselling and CBT differ?

  9. What impact would CBT have on my life?

  10. Can I help myself?

 

1. Are mental health problems common ?

In Britain one in four people suffer from a mental health problem.

Having a mental health problem is not a sign of weakness and is not something to be ashamed of. It is possible to recover from a mental health problem and to live a fulfilling life.

2. What causes mental health problems?

The answer to this has caused debates between individuals for years, whether it could be due to nature (your genes) or nurture (your upbringing/ life experiences). The following list are possible causes of mental health problems:

  • Difficult upbringing/ family background
  • Stressful life events
  • Long term health conditions/ pain
  • Biochemistry (following a fight or flight situation if physical activity does not use up all of your adrenalin, the body remains tense and the mind stays over active).
  • Genes (although many argue that this is unlikely)
  • Social concerns

3. How are mental health problems diagnosed?

Your GP or a Psychiatrist can diagnose a mental health problem by looking at the symptoms you experience. For some, being given a label can be useful, however, others find this damaging.

4. Is a diagnosis necessary for treatment with Capital CBT?

No. Your therapist will work with you to help you achieve your goals, a diagnosis is not necessary. Your therapist may use your symptoms to help guide the treatment you receive but they will not diagnose you. Neither will we give advice on medication.

5. What are the most common mental health problems?

Depression

Symptoms Include:

  • Low mood
  • Feeling hopeless or worthless
  • Lack of motivation
  • Feeling bad about yourself
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Little interest or pleasure in doing things
  • Feeling tired/ lethargic
  • Changes in sleep patterns (sleeping more or less)
  • Changes in appetite (eating more or less than normal)
  • Thoughts about harming yourself or committing suicide

Anxiety

Symptoms Include:

  • Feeling nervous/ anxious or on edge
  • Feeling restless
  • Problems sleeping
  • Not being able to stop or control worrying
  • Trouble relaxing
  • Becoming easily annoyed or irritable
  • Feeling afraid as if something awful might happen
  • Unpleasant physical symptoms such as increased heart beat, muscle tension, panic attacks and many more

Other common mental health problems include: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), stress, specific phobias, social phobias, panic attacks, eating disorders and bipolar disorder. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is also getting increased exposure in the media. Capital CBT offers various treatments for PTSD, including CBT and EMDR. We are happy to treat members of the armed forces and veterans.

6. How can mental health problems be treated?

Different options are available to you and the treatment recommended will depend on your symptoms and their severity. The NICE guidelines (based on published evidence, research studies and real life experiences) set out the recommendations for the treatment of mental health problems in the NHS.

Therapy

Capital CBT offers talking therapies as treatment (as recommended in the NICE guidelines), helping you to make long term changes, aiming to help you to better manage your mental health yourself. Capital CBT offers:

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy
  • EMDR
  • Mindfulness

Other forms of talking therapy include:

  • Counselling
  • Group therapy
  • Family therapy

If you find talking difficult then an art therapy may be more suited to you rather than a talking therapy, such as, music, dance, painting.

Medication

Medication is another treatment option, these don't 'cure' the mental health problem but will alleviate or ease the distressing symptoms.

Complimentary Therapies

Complementary therapies such as hypnotherapy, acupuncture, nutrition, reflexology and massage have also been found by some to be a helpful way to manage stress and ease some of the tension that can build up in the body when anxious or depressed.

7. How can complimentary therapies help mental health?

See our page titled additional services.

8. How do counselling and CBT differ?

CBT does not dwell on the past in order to gain insight into your current emotional state. CBT tends to deal with the here and now, whilst it recognises that past events have shaped the way you currently think and behave this is not the main focus of the therapy. CBT is a solution focussed therapy that is structured in order to meet your goals. 'A counselling approach, in contrast, tends to be non directive, supporting you in talking through your problems refraining from offering advice or specific help in overcoming symptoms.

9. What impact would CBT have on my life?

Depression and anxiety are unpleasant. They can seriously affect your ability to work and enjoy life. CBT can help you to manage and control your symptoms. Easing these symptoms can have a positive impact on other areas of your life.

10. Can I help myself?

The answer to this question is YES. There are many ways you can improve your mental health. These include:

Self help guides and books

There are good self help guides on the internet that you can download for free. Also please see our useful resources section. These take commitment as you will have to be strict with yourself to do the work but they can be great to help you to understand the problem and break the cycle that you may be stuck in.

Physical activity

Activity can make us feel better. You don't have to run a marathon, physical activity can be tailored to your fitness levels and suit your routine. Something as simple as going out for a walk or a short bike ride constitutes physical activity.

Relationships

Connecting with others can make a difference to the way we feel. Don't withdraw from others but spend some more time working on relationships, whether that's with friends, family or colleagues.

Live in the present

Learn to live in the present moment. Slow down and spend more time experiencing and less time being caught up in your thoughts.

Be assertive and express yourself

This isn't always easy but with a bit of work you can learn to assert yourself. Saying how you feel will stop the build up of less pleasant emotions and tension. Repressing these emotions can cause stress. This also means that you are facing up to problems and not burying your head in the sand.

Learn something new

Learning something new can give you a sense of achievement and boost your confidence.